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Pied Piper charity has new man at the helm

By The Citizen  |  Posted: February 10, 2014

Nickbroady

Nickbroady

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TAKING a sick child to hospital is one of the most distressing events facing a parent.

But every parent knows that the little things - as well as state-of-the-art equipment - mean the world in those moments, such as being able to sleep in a bed next to your little one on the ward.

And it’s thanks to Gloucestershire charity the Pied Piper Appeal that mums and dads can now stay through the night.

The medical charity has spent £150,000 in the county in the last year, including buying eight beds for parents to sleep in.

Pied Piper was established 20 years ago, and now there’s a new face at the helm of this charity which focuses on making lives easier for Gloucestershire children living with disability and serious illness.

Nick Broady is the new chairman of Pied Piper appointed last week to succeed Roger Head and Peter Hickman both of whom led the charity for 10 years.

But he isn’t a new face to the organisation.

Nick, 51, has been bringing his business sense and enthusiasm to the charity for many years, working closely alongside Roger and the rest of the team as its vice chairman.

Born and raised in Gloucester, Nick is the managing director of Avenue Cars group and Gloucester Coating Ltd with a commercial property portfolio. He also finds the time to run Brickhampton Golf club. And he’s a keen sportsman, who has represented Gloucestershire in squash and pool and played football for Longford football club.

He started his working life as a 16-year-old trainee car hire and car salesman. Now he’s the man behind several thriving businesses. Among it’s many products, Gloucester Coating Ltd manufactures ski helmets which are sent all over the world.

But the Pied Piper is clearly something Nick feels passionately about.

Founded in 1992 it helped to fund a new children’s wing at Gloucestershire Royal Hospital raising a staggering £1.3 million.

Today the charity raises funds to buy life-changing medical and practical equipment that can transform the lives of sick and disabled children in Gloucestershire.

In the last 20 years it’s raised more than £3 million to support county children and families.

Nick knows the value of good care and a welcoming environment. He has first-hand experience of being a child patient at Gloucestershire Royal.

“I had asthma as a child. It was treated differently then, and I regularly was admitted to Gloucestershire Royal. To a child it seemed like a prison then. I can picture it now,” he said.

“Seeing what I went through, and what my family went through, I wanted to help make a difference.”

Like so many children who are treated in hospital stay, the experience is etched on his memory.

Today, though a visit to GRH, should leave a warmer impression. Nick is proud of the cheerful family-friendly atmosphere that Pied Piper has helped to create.

“There’s a great play area, a sensory room, TVs, ipads and a toy room. Parents sometimes say to me ‘my child doesn’t want to leave hospital’” said Nick

The charity has also bought five neo-natal units as well as eight high-specification beds for parents which enable them to sleep next to their sick child.

But it’s not just hospitals that have benefited from the Pied Piper’s support.

A few years ago it expanded its aims to support the wider community. Pied Piper now incorporates Cloud 9,which provides holidays for children who suffer from acute and terminal illness. Last year Cloud 9 enabled 52 children, to enjoy a holiday with their family.

“Cloud 9 is very important to me. It’s such a positive thing for these families,” said Nick.

And now Pied Piper also works closely with the county’s special schools for children with disabilities and has supported Milestone, The Shrubberies, Bettridge and St Roses Schools.

“We’ve just delivered a new minibus to Heart of the Forest school, and ordered another bus for The Shrubberies,” said Nick.

Each bus costs around £50,000. Like everything that Piper Piper supplies, costs for specialist products are high.

But Nick said Pied Piper succeeds by keeping its administration costs to a minimum.

“We’re not a fundraiser for the NHS. We’re independent and we keep the needs of sick children in mind. If we can make life better, or more comfortable then that’s our aim.”

Times are tough for many charities, but Pied Piper has succeeded in increasing the money it raises each year. Having a local focus helps, says Nick, and he brings his business acumen to the management of the charity.

“Costs are kept to a minimum. Apart from two members of staff, everyone else is a volunteer. Without the volunteers we haven’t got a successful charity. Their contribution is invaluable.”

He’s also grateful for the support of Gloucester’s business community, which has played a key role in the success of fundraising events such as the annual Citizen backed fundraising motorshow, in Highnam Court in June.

“The local businesses and community have been the key to Pied Piper.

“I’ve been lucky enough in business to do well. Pied Piper is about putting something back in the community.”

“Being able to see the smiles on their faces and make a difference is amazing.”

THERE’S nothing more distressing than taking a sick child to hospital.

But every parent knows that the little things - as well as state-of-the-art equipment - mean the world in those moments, such as being able to sleep in a bed next to your little one on the ward.

And it’s thanks to Gloucestershire charity the Pied Piper Appeal that mums and dads can now stay through the night.

The medical charity has spent £150,000 in the county in the last year, including buying eight beds for parents to sleep in.

Pied Piper was established 20 years ago, and now there’s a new face at the helm of this charity which focuses on making lives easier for Gloucestershire children living with disability and serious illness.

Nick Broady is the new chairman of Pied Piper appointed last week to succeed Roger Head and Peter Hickman both of whom led the charity for 10 years.

But he isn’t a new face to the organisation.

Nick, 51, has been bringing his business sense and enthusiasm to the charity for many years, working closely alongside Roger and the rest of the team as its vice chairman.

Born and raised in Gloucester, Nick is the managing director of Avenue Cars group and Gloucester Coating Ltd with a commercial property portfolio. He also finds the time to run Brickhampton Golf club. And he’s a keen sportsman, who has represented Gloucestershire in squash and pool and played football for Longford football club.

He started his working life as a 16-year-old trainee car hire and car salesman. Now he’s the man behind several thriving businesses. Among it’s many products, Gloucester Coating Ltd manufactures ski helmets which are sent all over the world.

But the Pied Piper is clearly something Nick feels passionately about.

Founded in 1992 it helped to fund a new children’s wing at Gloucestershire Royal Hospital raising a staggering £1.3 million.

Today the charity raises funds to buy life-changing medical and practical equipment that can transform the lives of sick and disabled children in Gloucestershire.

In the last 20 years it’s raised more than £3 million to support county children and families.

Nick knows the value of good care and a welcoming environment. He has first-hand experience of being a child patient at Gloucestershire Royal.

“I had asthma as a child. It was treated differently then, and I regularly was admitted to Gloucestershire Royal. To a child it seemed like a prison then. I can picture it now,” he said.

“Seeing what I went through, and what my family went through, I wanted to help make a difference.”

Like so many children who are treated in hospital stay, the experience is etched on his memory.

Today, though a visit to GRH, should leave a warmer impression. Nick is proud of the cheerful family-friendly atmosphere that Pied Piper has helped to create.

“There’s a great play area, a sensory room, TVs, ipads and a toy room. Parents sometimes say to me ‘my child doesn’t want to leave hospital’” said Nick

The charity has also bought five neo-natal units as well as eight high-specification beds for parents which enable them to sleep next to their sick child.

But it’s not just hospitals that have benefited from the Pied Piper’s support.

A few years ago it expanded its aims to support the wider community. Pied Piper now incorporates Cloud 9,which provides holidays for children who suffer from acute and terminal illness. Last year Cloud 9 enabled 52 children, to enjoy a holiday with their family.

“Cloud 9 is very important to me. It’s such a positive thing for these families,” said Nick.

And now Pied Piper also works closely with the county’s special schools for children with disabilities and has supported Milestone, The Shrubberies, Bettridge and St Roses Schools.

“We’ve just delivered a new minibus to Heart of the Forest school, and ordered another bus for The Shrubberies,” said Nick.

Each bus costs around £50,000. Like everything that Piper Piper supplies, costs for specialist products are high.

But Nick said Pied Piper succeeds by keeping its administration costs to a minimum.

“We’re not a fundraiser for the NHS. We’re independent and we keep the needs of sick children in mind. If we can make life better, or more comfortable then that’s our aim.”

Times are tough for many charities, but Pied Piper has succeeded in increasing the money it raises each year. Having a local focus helps, says Nick, and he brings his business acumen to the management of the charity.

“Costs are kept to a minimum. Apart from two members of staff, everyone else is a volunteer. Without the volunteers we haven’t got a successful charity. Their contribution is invaluable.”

He’s also grateful for the support of Gloucester’s business community, which has played a key role in the success of fundraising events such as the annual Citizen backed fundraising motorshow, in Highnam Court in June.

“The local businesses and community have been the key to Pied Piper.

“I’ve been lucky enough in business to do well. Pied Piper is about putting something back in the community.”

“Being able to see the smiles on their faces and make a difference is amazing.”

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4 comments

  • kato48  |  February 10 2014, 9:43PM

    Thank you for your prompt reply, and your confirmation is heart warming as well as encouraging. I know the Pied Piper do an excellent job. The reason for my comments is because I totally refuse to pay a single penny to ANY charity if it is not being used as stated but purely to enhance the financial pockets of the powers to be. My respect and admiration for all your Volunteers, My apologies if my comments have caused any offence.

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  • Pied-Piper  |  February 10 2014, 7:25PM

    I can confirm that Nick's new position is 100% voluntary, with no form of expenses or remuneration. With regards to the staff, I'm not sure what you mean. Could you please email us what you would like to know - office@piedpiperappeal.co.uk

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  • Mildred1962  |  February 10 2014, 7:16PM

    I am a volunteer of the Pied Piper and have been for 10 years, Nick along with the other trustees are all volunteers and no they don't get paid. There are two paid members of staff and these are one full time and one part time and they do a great job. Volunteering for the Pied piper is so rewarding and fun.

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  • kato48  |  February 10 2014, 5:00PM

    I congratulate Nick Broady on his appointment, but with reservation, Is this a paid or voluntary position, and what is the status of the two paid members of staff ?

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