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New badger cull "will go ahead" in 2013

By CitizenNews  |  Posted: December 11, 2012

Badger cull in 2013?

Badger cull in 2013?

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Fresh calls for the Government to abandon a badger cull were rejected by ministers today.

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs minister Lord de Mauley confirmed the culling policy would be piloted initially in two areas next summer.

An independent panel of experts would evaluate the controlled shooting of badgers and report back to ministers for them to decide whether to order more extensive culling, he said.

Liberal Democrat Lord Greaves asked how much the aborted culls had cost and who was going to pay.

Lord de Mauley said there had been £750,000 spent on surveying costs, £300,000 on Natural England's costs and £95,000 on "humaneness monitoring".

Baroness Jan Royall of Blaisdon in the Forest of Dean, and Labour leader in the Lords, said: "My party still believes there is no scientific, economic or moral basis for culling."

She asked what the cost would be of a more intensive cull and if ministers were confident of recruiting enough marksmen.

Lord de Mauley said the cost of "not bearing down on TB" by controlling the badger population was £90 million a year and rising.

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  • stormkettle  |  December 23 2012, 9:00PM

    Just leave the badgers alone. If cattle cannot be farmed without killing badgers, then cattle farming in those specific areas is UNVIABLE.

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  • eyeopener  |  December 13 2012, 9:05PM

    Charles' dates seem wildly out Scientific work investigating the evolutionary origins of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex has concluded that the most recent common ancestor of the complex was a human-specific pathogen..... Analysis....has allowed dating of this Mycobacterium tuberculosis...to approximately 40,000 years ago, which corresponds to the period subsequent to the expansion of **** sapiens sapiens out of Africa. This analysis...also dated the Mycobacterium bovis lineage as dispersing approximately 6,000 years ago, which may be linked to animal domestication and early farming. Wirth, T., F. Hildebrand, et al. (2008). "Origin, spread and demography of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex." PLoS Pathog 4(9): e1000160."

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  • 2ladybugs  |  December 11 2012, 10:42PM

    Don't tell him but I have copied this from Charles' web:(( He wrote this 27/12/2010 M.bovis is not really 'The Cattle Strain'. People often call Mycobacterium.bovis "The Cattle Strain". . That is one of the major problems I believe. . When the bacteria that was causing the TB in cattle was first identified, it was named M.bovis, but as it first originated from M.tuberculosis (The human strain); it most likely first appeared in other animals, vermin or the like that scavenged at mans' "dustbins", latrines or graves; not the cattle. In a relatively recent report, researchers examined the ancient village of Atlit-Yam, which has been covered by water for the past several thousand years, and which has yielded skeletons and some of the earliest evidence for agriculture and for cattle domestication. According to one long-standing hypothesis, tuberculosis initially infected people who drank the milk of domesticated cattle that carried a unique strain of the TB bacterium. However, new DNA data from the two Atlit-Yam skeletons provides evidence that in a community with domesticated animals, but before dairying, the infecting strain of tuberculosis was actually the human pathogen. The researchers estimate that human tuberculosis first evolved around 10,000 years ago, when agriculture's emergence led to densely populated settlements that acted as petri dishes for infection. Tuberculosis may have infected small numbers of people before that, but the bacteria could not have spread widely in small bands of nomadic hunter-gatherers. One of the pleasures of science is that nothing remains certain forever.

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  • 2ladybugs  |  December 11 2012, 10:16PM

    "ackney", I doubt he would own up to that :)) Actually you may be surprised what wildlife there is in London, including badgers oh and rats by the thousands and foxes etc.etc. :((

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  • eyeopener  |  December 11 2012, 10:02PM

    Did Charlespk really say that he hadn't seen many badgers in Hackney? :))

  • 2ladybugs  |  December 11 2012, 9:42PM

    Ha!ha!ha......you are catching up. The Scientist mag. and National Geographic printed that ages ago. Actually I think I referred to it in one of my comments a couple of months back and Charlespk mentioned it months and months ago. Still it's always good to be reminded.

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  • eyeopener  |  December 11 2012, 9:31PM

    All of the comments on Human TB below make chashjtownley's comment even more pertinent. "Contrary to previous findings stating that tuberculosis passed from animals to humans, scientific research has revealed that tuberculosis passed from humans to animals instead. Scientific work investigating the evolutionary origins of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex has concluded that the most recent common ancestor of the complex was a human-specific pathogen..... Analysis....has allowed dating of this Mycobacterium tuberculosis...to approximately 40,000 years ago, which corresponds to the period subsequent to the expansion of **** sapiens sapiens out of Africa. This analysis...also dated the Mycobacterium bovis lineage as dispersing approximately 6,000 years ago, which may be linked to animal domestication and early farming. Wirth, T., F. Hildebrand, et al. (2008). "Origin, spread and demography of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex." PLoS Pathog 4(9): e1000160." History of tuberculosis - Wikipedia http://tinyurl.com/cg5ygml . In other words Human TB predates Bovine TB by 36,000 years! Taking all the above into account and my earlier comment which mentioned London as the TB capital of the West, how often do you encounter badgers in Newham?

  • 2ladybugs  |  December 11 2012, 9:27PM

    Yes Kent actually had the highest numbers of TB possibly because of the link to central Europe and immigrants coming in via the tunnel. I believe two new cases have been confirmed this month. Hospital patients warned over TB superbug 11 Dec 2012 by TIM UTTON, Daily Mail Doctors warned patients and staff at a hospital yesterday after an outbreak of a super strain of tuberculosis. They fear that dozens may have been infected by multi-drug resistant TB, which has been contracted by two patients at the Darent Valley Hospital in Kent. Public health doctors have sent warning letters to 600 patients and staff who may have come into contact with the potentially deadly strain. Read more: http://tinyurl.com/c4hyu6n

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  • eyeopener  |  December 11 2012, 9:15PM

    There may not be much written about their lordships mulling on the topic, but many studies including a comment in the Lancet do discuss TB in UK citizens and the impact of visitors from the developing world. London – the tuberculosis capital of Europe In a comment piece published today in The Lancet, Global TB expert Professor Alimuddin Zumla (UCL Infection & Immunity) calls for recommendations from a recent UK TB review to be implemented urgently to keep this re-emerging problem under control. The UK is the only country in Western Europe with rising rates of tuberculosis (TB), and cases in London have increased more than 50% since 1999. Nationwide, there are now more than 9,000 cases diagnosed per year. The problem is becoming particularly acute in London, where 40% of all UK TB cases are diagnosed. Professor Zumla said: "Poor housing, inadequate ventilation and overcrowding, conditions that were prevalent in Victorian Britain a century ago, are causes of the higher TB incidence rates in certain London boroughs. In all European countries TB is mainly concentrated in high risk groups such as migrants, refugees, homeless, drug users, prisoners and HIV-infected groups." London – the tuberculosis capital of Europe http://tinyurl.com/c9wasnb Newham, London is TB capital of the West Newham, in the East End, has 108 cases per 100,000 people. This is more than twice the rate in India, where there are 41 cases per 100,000, and more than Russia, where there are 91 cases. On an average day, seven people in London show the first symptoms of TB - a persistent cough, chest pains and sweats. The report showed that the total of cases in London last year was almost 3,000 - more than double that of New York, which has long been considered to have a serious problem and has spent $1 billion fighting its epidemic in the last decade. http://tinyurl.com/cejed7e

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  • 2ladybugs  |  December 11 2012, 8:11PM

    Ha!Ha!Ha!, do not fear, I might elevate you but the House of Lords would not be where you ended up :)))) You really should try to concentrate on meaningful things and not who said what, to whom or where or when. Did you know their Lordships were also discussing TB in humans and the significance of immigrants in the grand scenario. I can't see much written about that yet, can you?

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